Clinic Integration

METTCARE Clinic Integration solution is based on the requirement to provide an integrated view of all of the patient’s data available across multiple practices. It relies on the consent defined access rights based on a predefined set of rules. METTCARE Clinics Integration framework implements consent-based rules into its IDAPS module to provide a controlled and audited environment. No activity is possible before IDAPS establishes validity of the data access request and identifies parties in the process. The primary concern addressed by this solution is to provide controlled, consent-approved, and secure access to patient’s data required to deliver the best informed treatment by the healthcare providers.

The most important step that healthcare organizations have to do is to define their consent rights for data access between two parties. The consent can be as granular as required. It can be based on a treatment, provider’s specialisation, disease site, time, information format type, and the combination of any of these elements. Data owners and external requesters may establish access rules and groups that can be assigned to their respective healthcare providers. A bilateral agreement solution highly speeds up the process of establishing data access protocols as it does not require a long-term negotiation process on the level of either local healthcare networks or the entire province or state.

METTCARE clinics’ integration solution is based on the requirement to provide an integrated view of all of the patient’s data available across multiple practices. The primary concern addressed by this solution is to provide controlled, consent-approved, and secure access to patient’s data required to deliver the best informed treatment by the health care providers.

A single practice Electronic Medical Record (EMR) is defined in the METTCARE eXchange Health Care Framework. But to achieve a true multi-practice Electronic Health Record (EHR) required for the more informed patient’s care, additional requirements have to be fulfilled:
• Awareness that patient’s health data exists outside of the provisioning practice;
• Access to external health data sources, irrespective of the format (database data, images, video recordings, laboratory results in proprietary formats, spread sheets, notes, etc.).

METTCARE EHR solution is based on three main principles:
1. Data access security and audit. No health care facility will provide access to its own patients’ data to an external requestor if it does not trust the security of the data access solution.
2. Consent defined access rights based on the predefined set of rules. METTCARE clinics’ integration framework implements consent-based rules into its IDAPS module to provide a fully controlled and audited environment. No activity is possible before the IDAPS module establishes the validity of data access request and identifies both parties in the process.
3. Patient’s data is provided on the ‘view only’ principle. There is no data migration between two parties (the original data owner and the external requestor). This is a highly important principle as it resolves some of the principal problems faced by the health care providers as an obstacle in creating a virtual EHR.
• The original data owner has the assurance that their data will not be misused in any way (selling data to marketing groups, unauthorized transfer to pharmaceuticals, news organizations, etc.).
• Data is always current and therefore the most accurate. The data viewed by the health care provider is generated on demand in the present time. Data changes all the time, old misplaced information may become available that was not present before, additional external data providers may appear after the last request. As the data requestor is not storing the data on its own site, it does not have to have a data synchronization process in place. It greatly reduces the cost of data management and increases the accuracy and quality of information provided to the health care provider.

The most important step that health care organizations have to do is to define the consent rights for data access between two parties. The consent can be as granular as required. It can be based on treatment, provider, disease site, time, information format type, and the combination of any of these elements. Both sides (data owners and external requestors) may establish access rules and groups that can be assigned to their health care providers.

A bilateral agreement solution highly speeds up the process of establishing the data access protocols as it does not require a long-term negotiation process on the level of either LHINs or the entire province or state.